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Abbott, Robert D., Julie O'Donnell, J. David Hawkins, Karl G. Hill, Richard Kosterman, and Richard F. Catalano, "Changing Teaching Practices to Promote Achievement and Bonding to School," Vol. 68, No. 4, 1998, pp. 542-552.

Catalano, Richard F., and J. David Hawkins, "The Social Development Model: A Theory of Antisocial Behavior," in J. David Hawkins, ed., Cambridge, England: University Press, 1996.

Gorman, Dennis M., "Overstating the Behavioral Effects of the Seattle Social Development Project," Vol. 156, 2002, pp. 155-156.

Hawkins, J. David, and Richard F. Catalano, "Doing Prevention Science: A Response to Dennis M. Gorman and a Brief History of the Quasi-Experimental Study Nested Within the Seattle Social Development Project," Vol. 1, 2005, pp. 79-86.

Hawkins, J. David, Elizabeth von Cleve, and Richard F. Catalano, "Reducing Early Childhood Aggression: Results of a Primary Prevention Program," Vol. 30, No. 2, 1991, pp. 208-217.

Hawkins, J. David, Jie Guo, Karl G. Hill, Sara Battin-Pearson, and Robert D. Abbott, "Long-Term Effects of the Seattle Social Development Intervention on School Bonding Trajectories," Vol. 5, No. 4, 2001, pp. 225-236.

Hawkins, J. David, Richard F. Catalano, Dianne M. Morrison, Julie O'Donnell, Robert D. Abbott, and L. Edward Day, "The Seattle Social Development Project: Effects of the First Four Years on Protective Factors and Problem Behaviors," in Joan McCord and Richard E. Tremblay, eds., , New York, N.Y.: Guilford Press, 1992, pp. 139-161.

Hawkins, J. David, Richard F. Catalano, Rick Kosterman, Robert Abbott, and Karl G. Hill, "Preventing Adolescent Health-Risk Behaviors by Strengthening Protection During Childhood," Vol. 153, 1999, pp. 226-234.

Hawkins, J. David, Rick Kosterman, Richard F. Catalano, Karl G. Hill, and Robert D. Abbott, "Promoting Positive Adult Functioning Through Social Development Intervention in Childhood: Long-Term Effects from the Seattle Social Development Project," Vol. 159, No. 1, 2005, pp. 25-31.

Hirschi, Travis, Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 1969.

Lonczak, Heather S., Robert D. Abbott, J. David Hawkins, Rick Kosterman, and Richard F. Catalano, "Effects of the Seattle Social Development Project on Sexual Behavior, Pregnancy, Birth, and Sexually Transmitted Disease Outcomes by Age 21 Years," Vol. 156, No. 5, 2002, pp. 438-447.

O'Donnell, Julie, J. David Hawkins, Richard F. Catalano, Robert D. Abbott, and Edward Day, "Preventing School Failure, Drug Use, and Delinquency Among Low-Income Children: Long-Term Intervention in Elementary Schools," Vol. 65, No. 1, 1995, pp. 87-100.

The Community and Social Development Project ..

We offer the following courses as part of our social development projects:

World Bank project Community and Social Development Project N/A

The Seattle Social Development Project (SSDP) is a longitudinal study guided by the social development model (Catalano and Hawkins, 1996), which incorporates information on how protective and risk factors work together to enhance both positive and antisocial development. The model builds on differential association theory (Cressey, 1953; Matsueda, 1988), social learning theory (Bandura, 1977), and social control theory (Hirschi, 1969). The model hypothesizes that socialization follows the same processes whether it produces prosocial or problem behavior and suggests that development of prosocial or antisocial behavior is influenced by the degree of involvement and interaction with prosocial or delinquent peers (differential association), the skills required and the costs and rewards for that interaction (social learning), and the extent to which the youth subsequently become bonded toprosocial or antisocial individuals (social control).

Seattle Social Development Project - Promising Practices

The Seattle Social Development Project (SSDP) is a long term study that looks at the development of positive and problem behaviors among adolescents and young adults. J. David Hawkins and Karl G. Hill are the directors of the study. During the early 1980’s we worked with 18 elementary schools in the Seattle Public School District in a study on child development. At that time, 808 5th grade students and their parents agreed to be in a longitudinal (long-term) study and became the sample for the Seattle Social Development Project (SSDP). These participants and their parents have been interviewed regularly since 1985.

For more information or a presentation on our social development projects, please
We offer the following courses as part of our social development projects:

Seattle Social Development Project - WSIPP


The Seattle Social Development Project is based at the University of Washington in the School of Social Work. It is one of approximately ten ongoing projects at the .

For more information or a presentation on our social development projects, please

Seattle Social Development Project - Advocates for Youth

Community and social development project is a poverty reduction intervention projects targeted largely at both rural and urban communities in Oyo State. It is being managed by a state agency established by law and adopts the Community Driven Development [CDD] approach. The Community Driven Development [CDD] approach is a new initiative in poverty reduction strategy which places the poor at the drivers seat in decision making for development activities. It is participatory, enhances accountability, improves efficiency and effectiveness and can deliver project at much lower costs.

Nigeria - Community and Social Development Project : restructuring : Main report (English) Abstract

Nigeria - Community and Social Development Project (English) Abstract

Adolescents who join gangs are more frequently involved in serious delinquency compared with those who do not, yet few studies have conducted a prospective examination of risk factors for gang membership. The present study uses longitudinal data to predict gang membership in adolescence from factors measured in childhood. Data were from the Seattle Social Development Project, an ethnically diverse, gender-balanced sample (n = 808) followed prospectively from age 10 to 18. Logistic regression was used to identify risk factors at ages 10 through 12 predictive of joining a gang between the ages of 13 and 18. Neighborhood, family, school, peer, and individual factors significantly predicted joining a gang in adolescence. Youth exposed to multiple factors were much more likely to join a gang. Implications for the development of gang prevention interventions are discussed.